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Learning Goal: I’m working on a psychology multi-part question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.Week 3: The Self: Understanding Ourselves in a Social ContextThe following scenario illustrates how situational factors—in this case, input from others—can enhance one’s own base of self-knowledge. Were it not for the presence of Jane’s coworkers and supervisor, she would not have learned something new about herself. At work, Jane generally works alone and had never before managed a team. However, last month, her supervisor assigned her to a special project and asked that she assemble a team to complete it within the month. Jane found this team assignment daunting and had doubts that she was up to the task. Despite her fears, she assembled the team, assigned each team member a specific task, and got the job done well before deadline. Her team colleagues and supervisor were effusive in their praise of her organizational and leadership skills. Had it not been for their rave reviews, Jane would never have thought of herself as an extremely well-organized, effective leader; she believed she was simply doing her job—nothing more. She now learned something new about herself because of the feedback she received from her colleagues and supervisor. Have you ever learned something new about yourself because of the feedback you received from peers?This week, you will study how people develop their self-concept and explore how people use introspection, self-observation, and other people to develop knowledge of themselves. You will also look at the effects of social media on the development of people’s self-knowledge.Learning ObjectivesStudents will:
Analyze the development of the self-concept
Analyze how people use introspection, self-observation, and other people to acquire self-knowledge
Analyze the effect of social media on the self-knowledge process
Learning ResourcesRequired ReadingsAronson, E., Wilson, T. D., Akert, R. M., & Sommers, S. R. (Eds.). (2019). Social psychology (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
Chapter 5, “The Self: Understanding Ourselves in a Social Context”
Note: Viewing media and interactives embedded in the electronic version of this course text is not required for this course.Fein, S., & Spencer, S. J. (1997). Prejudice as self-image maintenance: Affirming the self through derogating others. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73(1), 31–44. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.73.1.31Fein, S., & Spencer, S. J. (1997). Prejudice as self-image maintenance: Affirming the self through derogating others. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73(1), 31–44. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.73.1.31Riyanto, Y. E., & Zhang, J. (2016). Putting a price tag on others’ perceptions of us. Experimental Economics, 19(2), 480–499. doi:10.1007/s10683-015-9450-3Fein, S., & Spencer, S. J. (1997). Prejudice as self-image maintenance: Affirming the self through derogating others. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73(1), 31–44. doi: http://dx.doi.org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/0…Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.Riyanto, Y. E., & Zhang, J. (2016). Putting a price tag on others’ perceptions of us. Experimental Economics, 19(2), 480–499. doi:10.1007/s10683-015-9450-3Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databasesRequired MediaWar of Thought. (2016, November 30). Stop comparing yourself to others on social media – animated [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPThNmxF7JYNote: This media program is approximately 5 minutes.Assignment: The Self-Knowledge ProcessPeople come to know themselves in large part by observing others’ reactions to them when engaged in face-to-face social interaction. The popularity of and reliance on social media (e.g., Facebook) for social connection interferes with the self-knowledge process. This interference is compounded, further, by the tendency for people to pose as who they wish to be but are not (Wright, White, & Obst, 2018). Others’ reactions to them as a source of self-knowledge is based, then, on an idealized presentation, and social feedback on this idealized presentation can have little self-knowledge value.Reference:Wright, E. J., White, K. M., & Obst, P. L. (2018). Facebook false self-presentation behaviors and negative mental health. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 21(1), 40–50.To Prepare
Review the Learning Resources for this week and consider how people present themselves on social media and the influence this may have on how people use introspection, self-observation, and other people’s reactions to know themselves.
Also, consider how reliance on social media for meaningful connection affects a person’s confidence when meeting new people.
When relying on social media for social connection, think about the unavailability of others’ perception of you and why that information might be relevant to building self-confidence.
Assignment:Submit 3–5 pages, excluding title page and reference page:
What implications does the pressure of presenting an ideal self on social media have in terms of how people use introspection, self-observation, and other people’s reactions to know themselves?
If relying on social media for social connection fails to provide useful information for developing an authentic self, then how confident might a person be when meeting new people face-to-face?
What information about how others perceive you might you need but do not get when relying on social media for social connection?
Your arguments and conclusions must be supported by social psychology theory and research.
In addition to the Learning Resources, search the Walden Library and/or Internet for peer-reviewed articles to support your Assignment. Use proper APA format and citations, including those in the Learning Resources.By Day 7Submission and Grading InformationTo submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:
Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK3Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” as the name.
Click the Week 3 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
Click the Week 3 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from this area
Week 5 Assignment: Attribution ErrorsWherever you go, you will be observing human behavior, and it is difficult not to make a judgment about people after observing how they behave. You might consider three people on a crowded bus to be kind if you see them give up their seats so a mother can sit down with her two young children. You might consider a grocery store employee to be rude if you asked him where to find the milk and he rolled his eyes and sighed heavily before directing you to its location. These two judgments would be logical—kind in the first case and rude in the second—because that is the type of people they appeared to be.However, social psychologists are more concerned with the external social conditions that influence behavior. Maybe only one of the people on the bus acted kindly and the other two gave up their seats because they did not want to be perceived as unkind by others on the bus. Perhaps the grocery store employee is usually kind, but he behaved rudely because he has been told to work an extra shift at the last minute and it means he will likely miss a friend’s birthday party. If you attribute someone’s behavior to her or his personality, your judgment may underestimate the social conditions that influenced the behavior. When explaining the causes of someone’s behavior, underestimating or discounting the social situation results in what social psychologists call an attribution error.For your assignment this week, you will look at a scenario and consider how the cause of a person’s behavior may be explained better by situational influences than one’s personality or internal disposition.To PrepareReview the Learning Resources for this week and consider how the causes of a person’s behavior may be explained by situational factors.
Consider the following scenario for this Assignment: Imagine that you have been summoned for jury duty in the United States. If you are selected to be on the jury, you will be hearing a rape case where a 23-year-old female alleges sexual assault. In order to select the jury (a process known by the Latin term voir dire), both the prosecutor and defense attorney question the jury pool to identify and dismiss for cause people who have strong opinions about the subject matter, who already know about the case, or who may be biased for or against either party to the trial. Attorneys may also dismiss members of the jury pool who they think will not be favorable to their case. These types of dismissals are called peremptory challenges and the attorneys have a limited number of them. During the process of jury selection, you notice the prosecutors are using their limited peremptory challenges to dismiss most of the young women from the jury pool. You find this peculiar, given that young women would seem to be most favorable to the prosecution’s case.
Assignment: Submit 1–2 pages, not including title page and reference page:Informed by social psychology theory, explain why the prosecutor was reluctant to seat young women on the jury. Please provide a detailed explanation for this seemingly odd behavior.
In addition to the Learning Resources, search the Walden Library and/or Internet for peer-reviewed articles to support your Assignment. Use proper APA format and citations, including those in the Learning Resources.By Day 7Submit your Attribution Errors Assignment.
Week 5: Social Perception: How We Come to Understand Other PeopleWe make judgments about other people (e.g., are they smart, sweet, successful, and likeable or arrogant, selfish, and superficial) based on limited exposure in a social context. We seldom take into account the situational factors that may have influenced someone’s behavior previous to or during that brief exposure. Imagine your friend Roxy arranged a get-together with her coworkers and invited you to join them. You have always enjoyed meeting new people, so this seemed like a nice opportunity. The plan was to meet for drinks at a neighborhood bar where introductions are made all around. You were sitting next to Julie, so it seemed natural to strike up a conversation with her. However, she was not at all friendly, hardly responding to your attempts at getting to know her. Though you thought she might become a new friend, your first impression suggested otherwise. Roxy called you the next day to ask if you had a good time. You mentioned how cold and unfriendly Julie was and that you were disappointed in a lost opportunity to make a new friend. Roxy said Julie was not herself that night; her mother had passed away the previous week and Roxy had convinced Julie that a night out with friends was just what she needed. You might feel the need to reevaluate your first impression. Roxy asked that you give her friend another chance and meet for lunch a few weeks later.Were it not for Roxy’s explanation of Julie’s unfriendly behavior, you might never have agreed to meet them for lunch. Fortunately, you did, and Julie is now a good friend of yours.This week, you will examine why first impressions can form so quickly and last for so long. You will also study the motivations people have for behaving the way they do.Learning ObjectivesStudents will:Analyze how first impressions form quickly and persist
Analyze situational factors affecting people’s behavior
Learning ResourcesRequired ReadingsAronson, E., Wilson, T. D., Akert, R. M., & Sommers, S. R. (Eds.). (2019). Social psychology (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.Chapter 4, “Social Perception: How We Come to Understand Other People”
Note: Viewing media and interactives embedded in the electronic version of this course text is not required for this course.Dexter, H. R., Penrod, S., Linz, D., & Saunders, D. (2006). Attributing responsibility to female victims after exposure to sexually violent films. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 27(24), 2149–2171.Attributing responsibility to female victims after exposure to sexually violent films by Dexter, H. R., Penrod, S., Linz, D., & Saunders, D., in Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Vol. 27/Issue 24. Copyright 2006 by Blackwell Publishing Inc. Reprinted by permission of Blackwell Publishing Inc. via the Copyright Clearance Center.Sirin, C. V., & Villalobos, J. D. (2011). Where does the buck stop? Applying attribution theory to examine public appraisals of the president. Presidential Studies Quarterly, 41(2), 334–357.Moskowitz, G. B., & Carter, D. (2018). Confirmation bias and the stereotype of the black athlete. Psychology of Sport & Exercise, 36, 139–146.doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2018.02.010Tausch, N., & Hewstone, M. (2010). Social dominance orientation attenuates stereotype change in the face of disconfirming information. Social Psychology, 41(3), 169–176. doi:10.1027/1864-9335/a000024Required MediaAndy Luttrell. (2016, November 10). What is the fundamental attribution error? [Video file]. Retrieved from Note: This media program is approximately 6 minutes.
Requirements: 3 or more pages assignments   |   .doc file